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Aqueduct
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Aqueduct

In antiquity, aqueducts transported water from one place to another, achieving a regular and controlled supply to a place that would not otherwise have received sufficient quantities. Consequently, aqueducts met basic needs such as the irrigation...
Ancient Timekeeping
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Timekeeping

The passage of time has always been a preoccupation of human beings, whether it be a question of satisfying basic needs such as when to eat and sleep, the importance of seasons for migratory and agricultural purposes or a more sophisticated...
Otho
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Otho

Otho was Roman emperor from January to April 69 CE. Immediately after the assassination of Galba, Otho, the governor of Lusitania, was proclaimed emperor by the army. However, the unrest that existed in the short reign of Galba would spell...
Galba
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Galba

Galba was Roman emperor from June 68 to January 69 CE. With the death of Emperor Nero on June 9, 68 CE, the Julio-Claudian dynasty officially ended, leaving the Roman Empire without a clear successor to the throne. With the assistance of...
Butrint
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Butrint

Butrint (ancient name Buthrotum) is located on the fertile coast of Epirus in present-day Albania and was an important settlement in Hellenistic and Roman times due to its position on the route from Italy to mainland Greece down the Ionian...
Greek Archaic Period
Definitionby James Lloyd

Greek Archaic Period

The Greek Archaic Period (c. 800- 479 BCE) started from what can only be termed uncertainty, and ended with the Persians being ejected from Greece for good after the battles of Plataea and Mykale in 479 BCE. The Archaic Period is preceded...
Greek Mythology
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Greek Mythology

Greek mythology was used as a means to explain the environment in which humankind lived, the natural phenomena they witnessed and the passing of time through the days, months, and seasons. Greek myths were also intricately connected to religion...
Nemea
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Nemea

Nemea was a religious sanctuary in the northern Peloponnese of Greece where pan-Hellenic athletic games were held every two years from 573 BCE until 271 BCE, after which, the Games were definitively moved to Argos. Early Settlement...
Hesiod
Definitionby James Lloyd

Hesiod

Hesiod (c. 700 BCE) in conjunction with Homer, is one of those almost legendary early Greek Epic poets. His works are not of comparable length to Homer's. Hesiod's poems are not epic because of their length, but because of their language...
Hades
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hades

Hades was both the name of the ancient Greek god of the underworld (Roman name: Pluto) and the name of the shadowy place below the earth which was considered the final destination for the souls of the dead. Perhaps the most feared of the...
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