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Symposium
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Symposium

The symposium (or symposion) was an important part of ancient Greek culture from the 7th century BCE and was a party held in a private home where Greek males gathered to drink, eat and sing together. Various topics were also discussed such...
The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry
Articleby Elaine Sanderson

The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry

The Ancient Greek symposium is often considered an important part of Greek culture, a place where the elite drank, feasted and indulged in sometimes decadent activities. Although such practices were present in symposia, the writing and performance...
Scene from a Symposium
Imageby James Lloyd

Scene from a Symposium

Attic red-figure calyx krater. Depicted here is a symposium scene, the male guests are reclining whilst the female aulos-player serenades them. By the Uppsala Painter. 11559, National Archaeological Museum, Athens
Ancient Greek Dance
Definitionby Nathalie Choubineh

Ancient Greek Dance

In ancient Greece, dance had a significant presence in everyday life. The Greeks not only danced on many different occasions, but they also recognized several non-performative activities such as ball-playing or rhythmic physical exercise...
Paestum Painting, Scene from a Symposium
Imageby Carole Raddato

Paestum Painting, Scene from a Symposium

Detail from lateral walls of the Tomb of the Diver depicting a symposium scene. The frescoes are painted on limestone slabs and are dated about 480-470 BCE. National Museum of Paestum, Italy.
Greek Symposium Scene
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Greek Symposium Scene

A scene from an Attic red-figure drinking cup showing two males at a symposium. First half of the 5th century BCE. (Mykonos Archaeological Museum)
Kylix with Symposium Scene
Imageby Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kylix with Symposium Scene

Red-figure kylix depicting male figures relaxing on a sofa during a symposium. Attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter. c. 480-470 BCE. 24.1 cm (9.5 in). Athens. (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece
Articleby Ollie Wells

Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece

Love, sex, and marriage in ancient Greece are portrayed in Greek literature as distinct, yet closely intertwined, elements of life. For many upper-class men, marriages did not take place for love, and other relationships, be it with men or...
Prostitution in Ancient Athens
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Prostitution in Ancient Athens

Prostitution in ancient Athens was legal and regulated by the state. During the Greek Archaic Period (c. 800-479 BCE) brothels were instituted and taxed by the lawgiver Solon (l. c. 630 - c. 560 BCE), and this policy continued into the Classical...
Wine in the Ancient Mediterranean
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Wine in the Ancient Mediterranean

Wine was the most popular manufactured drink in the ancient Mediterranean. With a rich mythology, everyday consumption, and important role in rituals wine would spread via the colonization process to regions all around the Mediterranean coastal...
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