Search Results: Phoenician Colonization

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Etruscan & Phoenician Inscriptions
Imageby Pufacz

Etruscan & Phoenician Inscriptions

Gold sheet plaques from Pygri, the port of Etruscan Cerveteri. In both the Etruscan and Phoenician alphabet they describe the separation of a space dedicated in the temple there for Astarte. c. 500 BCE (Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome)
Greek Temples of Sicily
Articleby Heinrich Hall

Greek Temples of Sicily

There are at least a thousand reasons to visit Sicily, the great island – indeed the largest in the Mediterranean – that forms the triangular football to the boot that is the Italian peninsula. They are all very good reasons...
Ancient Sicily
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Sicily

The Mediterranean island of Sicily, with its natural resources and strategic position on ancient trading routes, aroused the intense interest of successive empires from Carthage to Athens to Rome. Consequently, the island was never far from...
Trade in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Trade in Ancient Greece

Trade was a fundamental aspect of the ancient Greek world and following territorial expansion, an increase in population movements, and innovations in transport, goods could be bought, sold, and exchanged in one part of the Mediterranean...
Phoenician Bronze Bowl from Nimrud
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Phoenician Bronze Bowl from Nimrud

Over 150 bronze bowls were found in a palace at the city of Nimrud. These bowls were made in Phoenicia (modern-day Lebanese and Syrian coasts), and were brought to Nimrud as tribute or booty by one of the kings who campaigned in the west...
Baal Statue
Imageby Jastrow

Baal Statue

Baal, right arm raised. Bronze figurine, 14th-12th centuries, found in Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit).
Goddess Astarte Plaque
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Goddess Astarte Plaque

Terracotta plaque depicting the Canaanite goddess Astarte. The Late Bronze Age at Lachish. (The British Museum, London).
Paestum
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Paestum

Paestum, also known by its original Greek name as Poseidonia, was a Greek colony founded on the west coast of Italy, some 80 km south of modern-day Naples. Prospering as a trade centre it was conquered first by the Lucanians and then, with...
Tarentum
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tarentum

Tarentum (Taras, modern Taranto), located on the southern coast of Apulia, Italy, was a Greek and then Roman city. Controlling a large area of Magna Graecia and heading the Italiote League, Tarentum, with its excellent harbour, was a strategically...
Cats in the Ancient World
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Cats in the Ancient World

Cats and humans have shared in each other's lives for thousands of years and, even though they have not always been regarded as highly as in the present, have played an important role in a number of cultures. Always enigmatic, the cat has...
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