Search Results: Greek Colonization

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Ancient Greek Government
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Government

Ancient Greece witnessed a wide variety of government systems as people searched for the answers to such fundamental questions as who should rule and how? Should sovereignty lie in the rule of law, the constitution, officials, or the citizens...
Ancient Greek Science
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Ancient Greek Science

The achievements of ancient Greek science were amongst the finest in antiquity. Building on Egyptian and Babylonian knowledge, figures such as Thales of Miletus, Pythagoras, and Aristotle developed ideas in mathematics, astronomy, and logic...
Battle of Salamis
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Battle of Salamis

The Battle of Salamis was a naval battle between Greek and Persian forces in the Saronic Gulf, Greece in September 480 BCE. The Greeks had recently lost the Battle of Thermopylae and drawn the naval Battle at Artemision, both in August 480...
Trade Routes in the Ancient Mediterranean
Imageby Simeon Netchev

Trade Routes in the Ancient Mediterranean

A map illustrating the boundaries, spheres of influence, and the flow of trade around the Mediterranean Sea between the 7th and 4th centuries BCE.
Greek Astronomy
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Greek Astronomy

Astronomy is an area where the Greeks displayed a remarkable talent. Observational astronomy, which was the main form of astronomy elsewhere, was taken a step further in Greece: they attempted to build a model of the universe that could account...
Ancient Greek Warfare
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Warfare

In the ancient Greek world, warfare was seen as a necessary evil of the human condition. Whether it be small frontier skirmishes between neighbouring city-states, lengthy city-sieges, civil wars, or large-scale battles between multi-alliance...
Leptis Magna
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Leptis Magna

Leptis Magna (aka Lepcis Magna), located in western Libya, North Africa, was a Phoenician city founded by Tyre in the 7th century BCE. Continuing to be a major city in the Roman period, it was the birthplace of Emperor Septimius Severus (r...
Tophet
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tophet

The tophet (also topheth) was a sacred precinct usually located outside cities where sacrifices and burials were made, especially of young children, in rituals of the Phoenician and then Carthaginian religion. The tophet is the most evident...
Trade in the Phoenician World
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Trade in the Phoenician World

The Phoenicians, based on a narrow coastal strip of the Levant, put their excellent seafaring skills to good use and created a network of colonies and trade centres across the ancient Mediterranean. Their major trade routes were by sea to...
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus was located on the western coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and built in the 6th century BCE. Such was its tremendous size, double the dimensions of other Greek temples including the Parthenon, that it...
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