Search Results: Greek Colonization

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Colchis & Iberia in Antiquity
Articleby Tedo Dundua

Colchis & Iberia in Antiquity

Colchis (western Georgia) and Kartli/Iberia (eastern and southern Georgia) were important regions in the Caucasus area of Eurasia from the Bronze Age of the 15th century BCE. Prospering through agriculture and trade, the region attracted...
Battle of Plataea
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Battle of Plataea

The Battle of Plataea was a land battle between Greeks and Persians near the small town of Plataea in Boeotia in 479 BCE. Following up their naval victory at the Battle of Salamis in September 480 BCE against the same enemy, the Greeks again...
Daily Life & Religion in Ancient Greece
Lesson Packby Patrick Goodman

Daily Life & Religion in Ancient Greece

We have prepared three lesson plans and two supplemental lesson plans including classroom activities, assignments, homework, and keys as well as: Multiple choice quiz questions in an excel format. Glossary of keywords and concepts...
French & Dutch colonization: 1607-1754 CE
Videoby Khan Academy

French & Dutch colonization: 1607-1754 CE

In the 1600s CE, French and Dutch settlers in North America took a very different approach to colonization than their English or Spanish counterparts. In this video, Kim Kutz Elliott examines the trading relationships that French and Dutch...
The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry
Articleby Elaine Sanderson

The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry

The Ancient Greek symposium is often considered an important part of Greek culture, a place where the elite drank, feasted and indulged in sometimes decadent activities. Although such practices were present in symposia, the writing and performance...
Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre

Greek theatre likely sprang from the lyrical performance of ancient epic poetry and the rituals performed in the worship of the god Dionysos where goats were sacrificed and participants wore masks. From the 6th century BCE, Greek tragedy...
Roman Warfare in the Age of Pyrrhus
Articleby Christopher L. Serafin

Roman Warfare in the Age of Pyrrhus

The Roman army fought many conflicts throughout its long history, though perhaps none so indelible as the Pyrrhic War from 280 to 275 BCE. This war between Rome and a league of Greek colonies in southern Italy led by the city of Tarentum...
Hippolytus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Hippolytus

Hippolytus is a tragedy written by Euripides (c. 484-407 BCE), one of the great Greek playwrights of the early 5th century BCE. As with many tragedies of the era, the central focus of Hippolytus is humanity's relationship with the gods. Hippolytus...
Thales of Miletus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Thales of Miletus

Thales of Miletus (l. c. 585 BCE) is traditionally regarded as the first Western philosopher and mathematician. He was born and lived in Miletus, a Greek colony on the west coast of present day Turkey, referenced as the birthplace of Greek...
Roman Literature
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Literature

The Roman Empire and its predecessor the Roman Republic produced an abundance of celebrated literature; poetry, comedies, dramas, histories, and philosophical tracts; the Romans avoided tragedies. Much of it survives to this day. However...
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