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Amphora
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Amphora

An amphora (Greek: amphoreus) is a jar with two vertical handles used in antiquity for the storage and transportation of foodstuffs such as wine and olive oil. The name derives from the Greek amphi-phoreus meaning 'carried on both sides'...
A Visual Glossary of Greek Pottery
Articleby Mark Cartwright

A Visual Glossary of Greek Pottery

Alabastron (pl. alabastra) - a small jar for storing perfumes, named after the material (alabaster) the first examples were made from. They were often carried by a string looped around the neck of the vessel. Amphora (pl. amphorae...
Black Figure Pottery
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Black Figure Pottery

Black figure pottery is a type of Greek pottery named after the colour of the scenes painted on vessels. It was first produced in Corinth c. 700 BCE and then adopted by pottery painters in Attica, where it would become the dominant decorative...
Ancient Greek Pottery
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Pottery

The pottery of ancient Greece from c. 1000 to c. 400 BCE provides not only some of the most distinctive vase shapes from antiquity but also some of the oldest and most diverse representations of the cultural beliefs and practices of the ancient...
Fran├žois Vase
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Fran├žois Vase

The François Vase is a large Attic volute-krater dating to c. 570-565 BCE, and it is perhaps the example par excellence of the black-figure pottery style. An astonishing range of scenes and characters from Greek mythology cover the...
Red-Figure Pottery
Definitionby Heather Montgomery

Red-Figure Pottery

Red-figure Pottery is a style of Greek vase painting that was invented in Athens around 530 BCE. The style is characterized by drawn red figures and a painted black background. Red-Figure Pottery grew in popularity, and by the early 5th century...
Trade in the Byzantine Empire
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Trade in the Byzantine Empire

Trade and commerce were essential components of the success and expansion of the Byzantine Empire. Trade was carried out by ship over vast distances, although for safety, most sailing vessels were restricted to the better weather conditions...
Nikosthenic Amphora with Dancing Satyrs & Maenads
Imageby The Cleveland Museum of Art

Nikosthenic Amphora with Dancing Satyrs & Maenads

Nikosthenic amphora, c. 550-525 BCE, signed (under the handle) by Nikosthenes, attr. to Painter N., Thiasos Group, Attic, from Caere, Etruria, The Cleveland Museum of Art, no. 1974.10 A group of Dionysiac dancers, seven satyrs alternating...
The Olive in the Ancient Mediterranean
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Olive in the Ancient Mediterranean

Olives and olive oil were not only an important component of the ancient Mediterranean diet but also one of the most successful industries in antiquity. Cultivation of the olive spread with Phoenician and Greek colonization from Asia Minor...
The Portland Vase
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Portland Vase

The Portland Vase is a Roman two-handled glass amphora dating to between the second half of the 1st century BCE and the early 1st century CE. The vase has a cameo-like effect decoration which perhaps depicts the marriage of Peleus and Thetis...
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