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Aeschylus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Aeschylus

Aeschylus (c. 525 - c. 456 BCE) was one of the great writers of Greek Tragedy in 5th century BCE Classical Athens. Known as 'the father of tragedy', the playwright wrote up to 90 plays, winning with half of them at the great Athenian festivals...
Aeschylus
Imageby Carole Raddato

Aeschylus

Portrait of the Athenian tragedian Aeschylus, Roman copy of a Greek original from the 4th century BCE, from Italy (Neues Museum, Berlin).
Ancient Greek Tragedy
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Tragedy

Greek tragedy was a popular and influential form of drama performed in theatres across ancient Greece from the late 6th century BCE. The most famous playwrights of the genre were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and many of their works...
Prometheus Bound
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Prometheus Bound

The Greek dramatist Aeschylus (c. 525 - c. 456 BCE) is considered one of the greatest tragic playwrights of his generation. He is often referred to as the “Father of Greek Tragedy.” Older than both Sophocles and Euripides, he...
Agamemnon (Play)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Agamemnon (Play)

The play Agamemnon was written by one of the greatest Greek tragedians Aeschylus (c. 525 – 455 BCE), “Father of Greek Tragedy.” Older than both Sophocles and Euripides, he was the most popular and influential of all tragedians...
Ancient Greek Literature
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ancient Greek Literature

Greek literature has influenced not only its Roman neighbors to the west but also countless generations across the European continent. Greek writers are responsible for the introduction of such genres as poetry, tragedy, comedy, and western...
Seven Against Thebes
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seven Against Thebes

Seven Against Thebes is the third part of a trilogy written by one of the greatest of the Greek tragedians, Aeschylus in 467 BCE, winning first prize in competition at Dionysia. Unfortunately, only fragments of the first two plays, Laius...
Libation Bearers
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Libation Bearers

The play Libation Bearers was written by one of the greatest of all Greek tragedians Aeschylus (c. 525-455 BCE). Winning first prize at the Dionysia competition in 458 BCE, Libation Bearers was the second play in the trilogy The Oresteia...
Ancient Greek Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Theatre

Greek theatre began in the 6th century BCE in Athens with the performance of tragedy plays at religious festivals. These, in turn, inspired the genre of Greek comedy plays. The two types of Greek drama would be hugely popular and performances...
The Eumenides
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

The Eumenides

The Eumenides is a play written by Aeschylus (c 525 – 455 BCE), the “Father of Greek Tragedy,” the most popular and influential of all tragedians of his era. The Eumenides was the third play of a trilogy, The Oresteia, with...
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