The Taifa Kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula, 1031-1086

Illustration

Simeon Netchev
by
published on 13 May 2022

A map illustrating the fragmented political situation in Al-Andalus (the Muslim-ruled area of the Iberian Peninsula) after the collapse of the Umayyad Caliphate of Cordoba in 1031. Known as taifas (from Arabic "party" or "faction"), numerous mini-states (as many as 50 according to some scholars) emerged, existing in constant turmoil and competition as, gradually, only about half a dozen remained grouped around the larger cities: Zaragoza, Valencia, Toledo, Badajoz, Seville, and Granada. Then in 1085, seizing the opportunity, Alfonso VI (king of León and Castile) took over the taifa of Toledo, and the rest turned for protection to the newly established, fundamentalist dynasty of the Almoravids in the Maghreb.

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About the Author

Simeon Netchev
Simeon is a freelance visual designer with a deep interest in the human side of history. He believes that every image should be an interaction, a commentary, and a narrative, and every map should lead on an exciting journey of exploration and discovery.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Netchev, S. (2022, May 13). The Taifa Kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula, 1031-1086. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15872/the-taifa-kingdoms-of-the-iberian-peninsula-1031-1/

Chicago Style

Netchev, Simeon. "The Taifa Kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula, 1031-1086." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 13, 2022. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15872/the-taifa-kingdoms-of-the-iberian-peninsula-1031-1/.

MLA Style

Netchev, Simeon. "The Taifa Kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula, 1031-1086." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 13 May 2022. Web. 30 Sep 2022.

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