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Roman Theatre Façade, Aosta
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Roman Theatre Façade, Aosta

The 22 m high façade (scaena) of the Roman theatre at Aosta in northern Italy. The theatre was constructed in the 1st century CE and further extended in the 3rd century CE. The theatre had a capacity of 3-4,000 spectators.
Dion Hellenistic Theatre, Greece
Imageby Carole Raddato

Dion Hellenistic Theatre, Greece

The Hellenistic Theatre at Dion in Macedon with Mount Olympus in the background. The theatre was built into a natural hill during the 3rd century BCE. It underwent several phases of modification during the reign of Philip V (r. 221-179 BCE...
Ancient Greek Comedy
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Comedy

Ancient Greek comedy was a popular and influential form of theatre performed across ancient Greece from the 6th century BCE. The most famous playwrights of the genre were Aristophanes and Menander and their works and those of their contemporaries...
Epidaurus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Epidaurus

Epidaurus was an ancient religious site and settlement located on the fertile Argolid plain of the east Peloponnese in Greece. Blessed with a mild climate and natural springs, the sanctuary of Asclepius at Epidaurus was an important sacred...
Segesta
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Segesta

Segesta (or Egesta), located in the north-west corner of Sicily, was an important trading town from the 7th century BCE onwards. Situated on the strategically advantageous slopes of Mt. Barbaro, yet still close enough to the coast to support...
Daily Life in Medieval Japan
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Daily Life in Medieval Japan

Daily life in medieval Japan (1185-1606 CE) was, for most people, the age-old struggle to put food on the table, build a family, stay healthy, and try to enjoy the finer things in life whenever possible. The upper classes had better and more...
The Plays of Cratinus
Articleby James Lloyd

The Plays of Cratinus

Cratinus was a highly successful writer of Attic Old Comedy, but the very fragmentary nature of his surviving plays means that he is not as well remembered as Aristophanes (eleven of whose plays come down to us intact). Despite this, it is...
Globe Theatre Model
Imageby Yair Haklai

Globe Theatre Model

A scale model of the Globe Theatre in London. Home of Elizabethan theatre, The Globe was first opened in 1599 CE and put on plays by such famous playwrights as William Shakespeare (1564-1616 CE).
Elizabethan Stage, the Swan Theatre
Imageby Aernout van Buchel

Elizabethan Stage, the Swan Theatre

A sketch by Aernout van Buchel showing actors on the stage of the Swan theatre in 1596 CE in London, one of the principal theatres of Elizabethan theatre. (Utrecht University Library, Netherlands)
Roman Theatre of Hierapolis
Imageby Carole Raddato

Roman Theatre of Hierapolis

The Roman theatre of Hierapolis in Phrygia (Turkey) was built in the 2nd century CE under Emperor Hadrian on the ruins of an earlier theatre following a devastating earthquake in 60 CE. It was later renovated under Septimius Severus (193-211...
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