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Elizabethan Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Elizabethan Theatre

Elizabethan theatre, sometimes called English Renaissance theatre, refers to that style of performance plays which blossomed during the reign of Elizabeth I of England (r. 1558-1603 CE) and which continued under her Stuart successors. Elizabethan...
Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus

The theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus on the south slope of the acropolis of Athens was first built in the 6th century BCE. Modified and expanded over the centuries, it is the oldest Greek theatre and is the site where some of the most famous...
Greek Theatre Architecture
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Greek Theatre Architecture

The ancient Greeks built open-air theatres where the public could watch the performances of Greek comedy, tragedy, and satyr plays. They then exported the idea to their colonies throughout the Aegean so that theatres became a typical feature...
Ancient Greek Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Theatre

Greek theatre began in the 6th century BCE in Athens with the performance of tragedy plays at religious festivals. These, in turn, inspired the genre of Greek comedy plays. The two types of Greek drama would be hugely popular and performances...
The Roman Theatre of Orange
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Roman Theatre of Orange

The Roman theatre of ancient Arausio (modern day Orange in southern France) is one of the best-preserved examples from antiquity. Built in the 1st century CE, it once had capacity for 9,000 spectators and is dominated by its massive stage...
Theatre of Marcellus
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Marcellus

The theatre of Marcellus was the largest and most important theatre in Rome and completed in the late 1st century BCE during the reign of Augustus. The architecture of the theatre would become a standard feature of theatres across the empire...
Noh Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Noh Theatre

Noh (Nō) theatre is a Japanese performance art which became especially popular from the 14th century CE and which is still performed today. Noh actors, who were always male in the medieval period, famously move and make gestures in a very...
Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus, Athens
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus, Athens

The 4th century stone version of the Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus, on the slopes of the acropolis of Athens. The theatre was orginally constructed in the 6th century BCE.
Satyr
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Satyr

Satyrs (aka silens) are figures from Greek mythology who were followers of the god of wine Dionysos and who were often guilty of excessive sexual desires and overindulgence of wine. Men with a horse's tail and ears or men with goat legs...
Theatre of Delphi
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Delphi

The theatre of Delphi and the temple of Apollo below (4th century BCE). The capacity of the theatre was around 5,000 spectators.