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Medieval Cures for the Black Death
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Medieval Cures for the Black Death

The Black Death is the 19th-century CE term for the plague epidemic that ravaged Europe between 1347-1352 CE, killing an estimated 30 million people there and many more worldwide as it reached pandemic proportions. The name comes from the...
Boccaccio on the Black Death: Text & Commentary
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Boccaccio on the Black Death: Text & Commentary

The Black Death is the name given to the plague outbreak in Europe between 1347-1352 CE. The term was only coined after 1800 CE in reference to the black buboes (growths) which erupted in the groin, armpit, and around the ears of those infected...
Plague of Cyprian, 250-270 CE
Articleby John Horgan

Plague of Cyprian, 250-270 CE

The Plague of Cyprian erupted in Ethiopia around Easter of 250 CE. It reached Rome in the following year eventually spreading to Greece and further east to Syria. The plague lasted nearly 20 years and, at its height, reportedly killed as...
Game Review: A Plague Tale: Innocence
Articleby Jan van der Crabben

Game Review: A Plague Tale: Innocence

A Plague Tale: Innocence is a true masterpiece of interactive storytelling. The video game (console versions on Amazon, PC version on Steam) takes the player back to medieval France. The country is troubled by both the Hundred Years' War...
Black Death
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Black Death

The Black Death was a plague pandemic which devastated medieval Europe from 1347 to 1352 CE, killing an estimated 25-30 million people. The disease originated in central Asia and was taken to the Crimea by Mongol warriors and traders. The...
Lucius Verus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Lucius Verus

Lucius Verus was Roman emperor from 161 to 169 CE. Lucius Verus was Marcus Aurelius' adopted brother and co-emperor, a man whose time on the throne is overshadowed by the reign of the last of the Five Good Emperors. In the final years of...
King's Evil
Definitionby John Horgan

King's Evil

The king’s evil (from the Latin morbus regius meaning royal sickness), more commonly known as scrofula or medically tuberculous lymphadenitis, was a skin disease believed to be cured by the touch of the monarch as part of their inherited...
Plague in the Ancient and Medieval World
Videoby The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Plague in the Ancient and Medieval World

The word 'plague', in defining a lethal epidemic, was coined by the physician Galen (l. 130-210 CE) who lived through the Antonine Plague (165 - c. 180/190 CE) but the disease was recorded long before in relating the affliction of the Plague...
Plague in an Ancient City
Imageby Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Plague in an Ancient City

"Plague in an Ancient City" by Michiel Sweerts (1618-1664 CE) is believed to depict the Plague of Athens (430-427 BCE). Oil on canvas. Painted c. 1652-1654 CE. 118.7 cm (46.7 in) x 170.8 cm (67.2 in). (Courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum...
Plague of Justinian & Yersinia pestis
Videoby The Lancet

Plague of Justinian & Yersinia pestis

Genomic analysis has shown that the plague of Justinian and the Black Death were caused by distinct strains of the same pathogen. Dr. Hendrik Poinar discusses the findings.Video copyright: McMaster University
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