Ancient History Encyclopedia has a new name!

We are now World History Encyclopedia to better reflect the breadth of our non-profit organization's mission. Learn More

Plague: Did you mean...?

Filters

You can refine the search results by selecting any of the filters below.

Clear Filters

Types

Categories

Periods

Subjects

Regions

Search

Elizabethan Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Elizabethan Theatre

Elizabethan theatre, sometimes called English Renaissance theatre, refers to that style of performance plays which blossomed during the reign of Elizabeth I of England (r. 1558-1603 CE) and which continued under her Stuart successors. Elizabethan...
Umar
Definitionby Syed Muhammad Khan

Umar

Umar ibn al-Khattab (r. 634-644 CE) was the second caliph of the Rashidun Caliphate (632-661 CE, as the first four caliphs are referred to by the Sunni Muslims). He was an early convert of Islam and one of the close companions...
Peasants' Revolt
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Peasants' Revolt

The Peasants' Revolt, also known as the Great Revolt, was a popular uprising in England in June 1381 CE. Beginning in the south-east and spreading to London and elsewhere, the rebellion's leaders, who included Wat Tyler, did not want...
Justinian I
Definitionby Will Wyeth

Justinian I

Justinian I reigned as emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 527 to 565 CE. Born around 482 CE in Tauresium, a village in Illyria, his uncle Emperor Justin I was an imperial bodyguard who reached the throne on the death of Anastasius in 518...
Hanseatic League
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hanseatic League

The Hanseatic League (also known as Hansa, Hanse, 1356-1862 CE) was a federation of north German towns and cities formed in the 12th century CE to facilitate trade and protect mutual interests. The league was centered in the German town of...
Christine de Pizan
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Christine de Pizan

Christine de Pizan (also given as Christine de Pisan, l. 1364 - c. 1430 CE) was the first female professional writer of the Middle Ages and the first woman of letters in France. She was born in Venice, Italy but her family soon moved to France...
Titus (Roman Emperor)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Titus (Roman Emperor)

Titus was Roman emperor from 79 to 81 CE. On June 24, 79 CE Titus Flavius Vespasianus succeeded his father Vespasian (r. 69-79 CE) as emperor of the Roman Empire. Prior to his ascension to the throne, he was considered by many as “…unpopular...
Edward the Black Prince
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Edward the Black Prince

Edward of Woodstock (1330-1376 CE), better known as the Black Prince after his distinctive armour or martial reputation, was the eldest son of Edward III of England (r. 1327-1377 CE). Made the Prince of Wales in 1343 CE, Edward would fight...
Genpei War
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Genpei War

The Genpei War (1180-1185 CE), also known as the Taira-Minamoto War, was a conflict in Japan principally between two rival clans: the Minamoto and Taira, for control of the imperial throne. The civil war was punctuated by a typhoon, earthquake...
Richard II of England
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Richard II of England

Richard II of England reigned as king from 1377 to 1399 CE. The son of the late Edward the Black Prince (1330-1376 CE), Richard would succeed his grandfather Edward III of England (r. 1327-1377 CE), but as he was only 10 years of age...