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Etruscan Pottery
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Etruscan Pottery

Etruscan pottery, produced over five centuries, was nothing if not varied. Indigenous wares such as the glossy black bucchero were made alongside red- and black-figure pottery imitating, yet modifying those produced in the Greek world. Geometric...
Old Town of Segovia and its Aqueduct (UNESCO/NHK)
Videoby UNESCO TV NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai

Old Town of Segovia and its Aqueduct (UNESCO/NHK)

The Roman aqueduct of Segovia, probably built c. A.D. 50, is remarkably well preserved. This impressive construction, with its two tiers of arches, forms part of the setting of the magnificent historic city of Segovia. Other important monuments...
Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida (UNESCO/NHK)
Videoby UNESCO TV NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai

Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida (UNESCO/NHK)

The colony of Augusta Emerita, which became present-day Mérida in Estremadura, was founded in 25 B.C. at the end of the Spanish Campaign and was the capital of Lusitania. The well-preserved remains of the old city include, in particular...
Roman Walls of Lugo (UNESCO/NHK)
Videoby UNESCO TV NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai

Roman Walls of Lugo (UNESCO/NHK)

The walls of Lugo in northern Spain were built in the later part of the 3rd century A.D. to defend the Roman town of Lucus. The entire circuit survives intact and is the finest example of late Roman fortifications in western Europe. Source...
Archaeological Ensemble of Tárraco (UNESCO/NHK)
Videoby UNESCO TV NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai

Archaeological Ensemble of Tárraco (UNESCO/NHK)

Tárraco (modern-day Tarragona) was a major administrative and mercantile city in Roman Spain and the centre of the Imperial cult for all the Iberian provinces. It was endowed with many fine buildings, and parts of these have been revealed...
The Armies of the Crusades
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Armies of the Crusades

The armies of the Crusades (11th-15th centuries CE), which saw Christians and Muslims struggle for control of territories in the Middle East and elsewhere, could involve over 100,000 men on either side who came from all over Europe to form...
Interview: Living in Silverado: Secret Jews in the Silver Mining Towns of Colonial Mexico
Interviewby James Blake Wiener

Interview: Living in Silverado: Secret Jews in the Silver Mining Towns of Colonial Mexico

Professor Emeritus David Gitlitz is one of the world’s leading experts on Jewish-Catholic interactions in Iberia and the Americas. While initially drawn to the literature of the Spanish Golden Age as a student at Oberlin and Harvard, the...
Justinian I
Definitionby Will Wyeth

Justinian I

Justinian I reigned as emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 527 to 565 CE. Born around 482 CE in Tauresium, a village in Illyria, his uncle Emperor Justin I was an imperial bodyguard who reached the throne on the death of Anastasius in 518...
Migration Age
Definitionby Jan van der Crabben

Migration Age

The Migration Period, also called the Barbarian Invasions or German: Völkerwanderung (wandering of the peoples), was a period of human migration that occurred roughly between 300 to 700 CE in Europe, marking the transition from Late Antiquity...
Knights Templar
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Knights Templar

The Knights Templar were established c. 1119 and given papal recognition in 1129. It was a Catholic medieval military order whose members combined martial prowess with a monastic life to defend Christian holy sites and pilgrims in the Middle...
Membership