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Electra by Euripides
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Electra by Euripides

Electra is a Greek tragedy written by the playwright Euripides c. 420 BCE. It retells the classic myth concerning the plotting of Electra and her brother Orestes to kill their mother and her lover. This version of the story should not be...
Electra by Sophocles
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Electra by Sophocles

Electra is a play written by the 5th-century BCE Greek tragedian Sophocles. Similar to Aeschylus' Libation Bearers, Electra focuses on the return of Electra's brother Orestes from exile and the plot to murder their mother. Years earlier...
Libation Bearers
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Libation Bearers

The play Libation Bearers was written by one of the greatest of all Greek tragedians Aeschylus (c. 525-455 BCE). Winning first prize at the Dionysia competition in 458 BCE, Libation Bearers was the second play in the trilogy The Oresteia...
Orestes & Electra
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Orestes & Electra

A marble representation of Orestes and Electra, the children of Agamemnon from Greek mythology. They stand before the tomb of their father and are in mourning as indicated by the postures and short hair of Electra. A stele behind Orestes...
Ancient Greek Tragedy
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Tragedy

Greek tragedy was a popular and influential form of drama performed in theatres across ancient Greece from the late 6th century BCE. The most famous playwrights of the genre were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and many of their works...
Sophocles
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Sophocles

Sophocles of Kol┼Źnos (c. 496 - c. 406 BCE) was one of the most famous and celebrated writers of tragedy plays in ancient Greece and his surviving works, written throughout the 5th century BCE, include such classics as Oedipus Rex, Antigone...
Euripides
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Euripides

Euripides (c. 484-407 BCE) was one of the greatest authors of Greek tragedy. In 5th century BCE Athens his classic works such as Medeia cemented his reputation for clever dialogues, fine choral lyrics and a gritty realism in both his text...
Oil Bottle with Tragic Mask
Imageby The Trustees of the British Museum

Oil Bottle with Tragic Mask

Red-figured squat lekythos (oil-bottle) with a tragic mask (perhaps Electra's) and a stage. Made in Lucania, Italy, c. 360-320 BCE. British Museum, London.
Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods

The Greek poet Hesiod (c. 700 BCE) is most famous for his works Theogony and Works and Days. In this passage from Theogony, Hesiod relates the birth of the gods from cosmic Chaos and follows the lineage through the great Zeus, King of the...
Zeus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Zeus

Zeus was the king of the Olympian gods and the supreme deity in Greek religion. Often referred to as the Father, as the god of thunder and the 'cloud-gatherer', he controlled the weather, offered signs and omens and generally dispensed justice...
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