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Solon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Solon

Solon (c. 640 – c. 560 BCE) was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker, and poet, who is credited with restructuring the social and political organisation of Athens and thereby laying the foundations for Athenian democracy. Such were his accomplishments...
Persian Immortals
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Persian Immortals

The Ten Thousand Immortals were the elite force of the Persian army of the Achaemenid Empire (c. 550-330 BCE). They formed the king's personal bodyguard and were also considered the shock troops of the infantry in Persian warfare. Their name...
Medea
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Medea

The tragedy Medea was written in 431 BCE by Euripides (c. 484 – 407 BCE). Euripides authored at least 90 plays of which 19 have survived intact. As with the plays by Sophocles and Aeschylus, the audience was already well aware of the...
Late Period of Ancient Egypt
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Late Period of Ancient Egypt

The Late Period of Egypt (525-332 BCE) is the era following the Third Intermediate Period (1069-525) and preceding the brief Hellenistic Period (332-323 BCE) when Egypt was ruled by the Argead officials installed by Alexander the Great prior...
Jerash
Definitionby James Blake Wiener

Jerash

Jerash (aka Gerasa, Gerash or Gerasha) is the capital and the largest city of the Jerash Governorate in Jordan, but in ancient times it was one of the wealthiest and most cosmopolitan cities in the ancient Near East. Settled by...
The Thirty Tyrants
Definitionby Christopher Planeaux

The Thirty Tyrants

The Thirty Tyrants (οἱ τριάκοντα τύραννοι) is a term first used by Polycrates in a speech praising Thrasybulus (Arist. Rhet. 1401a) to describe the brief 8-month...
Wars of the Diadochi
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Wars of the Diadochi

On June 10, 323 BCE Alexander the Great died in Babylon.  Although historians have debated the exact cause most agree that the empire he built was left without adequate leadership for there was no clear successor or heir. The military...
Cyclades
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Cyclades

The Cyclades are a group of islands in the southern Aegean situated between the Greek mainland and Turkey. The name was coined in the Archaic period as the islands form an approximate circle (kyklos) around the central and most sacred island...
Bacchae
Definitionby Marissa Swan

Bacchae

The Bacchae is a Greek tragedy written by the playwright Euripides (c. 484-406 BCE) in 407 BCE, which portrays Pentheus as an impious king, for the ruler of Thebes has denied the worship of Dionysus within...
Prometheus Bound
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Prometheus Bound

The Greek dramatist Aeschylus (c. 525 - c. 456 BCE)  is considered one of the greatest tragic playwrights of his generation. He is often referred to as the “Father of Greek Tragedy.” Older than both Sophocles and Euripides...