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Illyria - Exploring Ancient Albania
Articleby Carole Raddato

Illyria - Exploring Ancient Albania

Albania is located at the crossroads of the eastern Adriatic and was known as Illyria and Epirus throughout the Classical era. It played a strategic role in ancient times and was a point of contact between Illyrian, Greek, and Roman civilizations...
Nymphaeum at Apollonia, Albania
Imageby Carole Raddato

Nymphaeum at Apollonia, Albania

The rectangular basin of the Nymphaeum at Apollonia in Albania, fed by the underground water sources. 3rd century BCE. It is the biggest and best-preserved monument of Apollonia covering an area of 1,500 square metres.
Agora of Apollonia, Albania
Imageby Carole Raddato

Agora of Apollonia, Albania

The north-western edge of the Agora of Apollonia in Albania with the Bouleterion, the Triumphal Arch and the Odeon.
Large Stoa of Apollonia, Albania
Imageby Carole Raddato

Large Stoa of Apollonia, Albania

The large Stoa of Apollonia in Albania was built in the 4th century BCE. It is the best-preserved monument from the Classical period in the Agora and was used up to the 2nd century CE. It has a rectangular plan measuring 72.2m by 10.5m, divided...
Anaximenes
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Anaximenes

Anaximenes of Miletus (l. c. 546 BCE) was a younger contemporary of Anaximander and generally regarded as his student. Known as the Third Philosopher of the Milesian School after Thales (l. c. 585 BCE) and Anaximander (l. c. 610 - c. 546...
Cyrene
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Cyrene

Cyrene was an ancient Greek city on the North African coast near present-day Shahhat, a town located in north-eastern Libya. The precise location of the ancient city was thirteen kilometres from the coast. Cyrene is listed by UNESCO as a...
Corcyra
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Corcyra

Corcyra (modern Corfu and also known as Kerkyra) located in the Ionian sea is one of the northern most Greek islands and was an important polis or city-state in the Archaic and Classical periods. Possessing a significant naval fleet and controlling...
Philolaus
Definitionby Daniel Costa

Philolaus

Philolaus of Croton (c. 470 - c. 385 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher from Magna Graecia, in modern-day southern Italy. He shared the Pythagoreans’ interest in music, numbers and the soul, which shone through his output. He valued fire...
The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius

Diogenes of Sinope (c. 404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He was most likely a student of the philosopher Antisthenes...
The Rise of Cities in the Ancient Mediterranean
Articleby Oxford University Press

The Rise of Cities in the Ancient Mediterranean

The history of the ancient world has always been told as a history of cities, from Homer's epic poems about events just before and just after the sack of Troy, through the prose histories of wars between Athens and Sparta, Rome and Carthage...
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